Clinical Trials

NCT IdNCT04834063
TitleSerum Selenium and Zinc Levels in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients
ConditionNAFLD
StudyTypeObservational
OrganizationSohag University
Sponsor/CollaboratorsSohag University
StatusRecruiting
GenderAll
AgeGroupAdult
Older Adult
Location (with distance)
  • Mona Mohammed Abdelrahman, Sohag, Egypt
DescriptionNon-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes a wide range of disorders that consist of simple fatty infiltration, steatohepatitis (NASH), and end-stage liver disease (cirrhosis). NAFLD is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide and increases the risk of end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) . While risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, and a sedentary lifestyle may increase the risk of NAFLD, studies have shown that environmental exposures may further contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Although the pathogenic role of macronutrients is well established in both NAFLD and obesity, the contribution of micronutrients to NAFLD pathogenesis has garnered less attention than with obesity. Selenium is an essential element in many biological functions and is an important component of human nutrition. Exposure to selenium can be found in nature, such as rocks and sediment, air, soil, fuel oil, drinking water and nutritional supplementation. It is a major component of many enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and plays an important role in anti-oxidation, DNA synthesis, reproduction, muscle function, and thyroid metabolism. Selenium concentrations have been studied in many diseases and organ systems including the liver. However, the exact relationship between selenium in patients with NAFLD is unclear. Selenium is an essential element in many biological functions and is an important component of human nutrition. It is a major component of many enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and plays an important role in anti-oxidation, DNA synthesis, reproduction, muscle function, and thyroid metabolism. Selenium concentrations have been studied in many diseases and organ systems including the liver. However, the exact relationship between selenium in patients with NAFLD is unclear. Despite data suggesting mineral deficiencies in NAFLD patients, most data do not support insufficient mineral consumption as a possible mechanism for these deficiencies, except in the case of zinc deficiency. Zinc is the second most prevalent trace element in the body. It is integrally involved in the normal life cycle and has many important regulatory, catalytic, and defensive functions. Zinc deficiency occurs in many types of liver disease, especially more advanced/decompensated disease.