Clinical Trials

NCT IdNCT04108143
TitleUse of MonitorMe in COPD
ConditionChronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
StudyTypeInterventional
OrganizationUniversity of Lincoln
Sponsor/CollaboratorsUniversity of Lincoln
StatusRecruiting
GenderAll
AgeGroupAdult
Older Adult
Location (with distance)
  • University of Lincoln, Lincoln, LN6 7TS , United Kingdom
  • Lincolnshire Community Health Services NHS Trust, Lincoln, United Kingdom
DescriptionMonitorMe is a telephone device intended for the non-critical monitoring of vital signs in a domestic environment with the ability to automatically transmit data to a remote location via basic telephone connectivity. MonitorMe's low-cost, call automation and simple to use technology (i.e. based on the principles of an ordinary plug-in telephone) make it appropriate for a wide number of care pathways. It eliminates the need for a modem or broadband and avoids the challenges of less reliable smart phone technology. Typical use scenarios include remote monitoring of individual or multiple chronic disease states such as COPD to improve patient outcomes including prevention of emergency admissions. There is growing interest in the use of home telemonitoring in COPD in order to facilitate the management of the increasing numbers of patients and pressures on the NHS. Despite the positive effects of telemonitoring in conditions such as heart failure, benefits remain unproven in COPD and further work is required before wide-scale use. Furthermore, until now the evaluation of telecare and telehealth developments has focused mainly on effectiveness and efficiency, whereas their social, and ethical implications in particular, have not been explored in depth. We will also explore ethical issues related to the use of telehealth systems, from both the patients' and the healthcare professionals' perspective. The current feasibility study is designed to assess the acceptability, usability and validity of MonitorMe within one of its intended purposes i.e. remote monitoring of individual or multiple chronic disease states such as COPD.